Newly Available on Nonprofit Works: Latest BLS Data on Nonprofit Employment and Wages

By on November 7, 2018

Following on the heels of a recent addition of 2015 estimates of nonprofit employment, the Center for Civil Society Studies is pleased to announce the addition to the Nonprofit Works interactive database of a full set of data on 2016 nonprofit employment, wages, and establishments in states and counties through-out the U.S.! With this latest update, Nonprofit Works now brings the most-recent available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to the fingertips of nonprofit organizations, researchers, foundations, and those supporting them in states and counties throughout the country.
 
A crucial resource for understanding and advocating for the sector
The nonprofit sector is a far more significant part of the employment landscape of the U.S. than is widely understood, employing the third largest workforce, and supporting the third largest payroll, of any U.S. industry behind only retail trade and manufacturing. What is more, this sector continues to be unusually dynamic blunting the impact of the most recent U.S. recession by continuing to add jobs while the country’s for-profit business sector shed jobs at an alarming rate.

By putting these data in the hands of users both nationally and at the state and local level, Nonprofit Works makes it possible for them to:

  • Document the enormous scale and dynamism of this sector in their locales;
  • Show that nonprofits contribute significantly to local tax revenues;
  • Demonstrate the competitive wages that nonprofits offer in their fields; and
  • Spot key trends potentially threatening the nonprofit role.

 
With Nonprofit Works, you will be able to:

  • Report how many jobs nonprofits support in your state or county;
  • Identify the fields in which nonprofits make their contributions;
  • Compare nonprofit wages to those in business and government in the same fields;
  • Chart the relative growth of nonprofit and for-profit entities in key service fields; and
  • Identify gaps in nonprofit coverage.

 
 
Click here to start exploring Nonprofit Works today.
 
 
About Nonprofit Works
Nonprofit Works is an interactive database created by the Johns Hopkins University Center for Civil Society Studies. It builds on more than a decade of experience producing detailed reports on the nonprofit workforce in states and communities across the country and draws on official U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) surveys that also cover government and for-profit workplaces, making it possible to compare nonprofit employment and wages to those in these other sectors over time.
 
Nonprofit Works provides an easy-to-use 7-step Data Selection Wizard that makes navigation and data selection an easy and straight-forward process. Click here for a step-by-step tutorial on using the Nonprofit Works Data Selection Wizard.
 
Nonprofit Works Memberships
Nonprofit Works offers two tiers of access—Basic and Premium:

  • The Basic Tier offers users much of the benefit of Nonprofit Works for free.
  • The Premium Tier, available for a small fee, provides access both to: (a) comparative and contextual data—such as average weekly wages and how nonprofit employment and wages compare to those of for-profits in the same fields—and (b) to additional advanced user features, including more download options and saved searches.
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  • Multiple-Access Discount options. To foster wider use of the data, discount options are available for securing full Nonprofit Works Premium Account access for multiple employees of an organization, for multiple members of networks or associations, or for multiple grantees of funders. The Center for Civil Society Studies’ team will be happy to work with you to customize these memberships to fit your needs and budget. Please contact us with any questions or to get started.

 
For further information on the BLS QCEW database and the methodology used to extract nonprofit data from BLS files, click here.
 
For a sneak peek at some key findings from the 2016 update, click here.

 

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About the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies | email
The Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies is a leading source of ground-breaking research and knowledge about the nonprofit sector, social investing, and the tools of government. Working in collaboration with governments, international organizations, investment innovators, and colleagues around the world, the Center encourages the use of this knowledge to strengthen and mobilize the capabilities and resources of the public, nonprofit, and for-profit sectors to address the complex problems that face the world today. The Center conducts research and educational programs that seek to improve current understanding, analyze emerging trends, and promote promising innovations in the ways that government, civil society, and business can collaborate to address social and environmental challenges.
 
About the Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Economic Data Project (NED) | link
Nonprofit organizations are facing increased pressures in states and localities throughout the United States, but the nonprofit sector’s ability to respond to these pressures has been limited by a lack of timely information about how prevailing economic realities are affecting the sector. The Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Economic Data Project (NED) is helping to tackle this problem by charting economic trends in the nonprofit sector including how employment, wages, and finances have changed over time and in relation to other industries. Moreover, the project is able to analyze these data at the national, regional, state, and local levels, and to focus on particular subsectors—such as nursing homes, hospitals, home health centers, education, social services, and the arts. A collaboration between the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies, state employment security agencies, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and state nonprofit associations, the NED Project has thus far produced over 40 state, county, and regional Nonprofit Economic Data Bulletins since its founding in 2001, yielding a vital resource for understanding the nonprofit sector. Nonprofit Works is generously supported by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation.

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The Contribution of Rotary International Volunteering

By on November 6, 2018

Rotary International is partnering with the Johns Hopkins University Center for Civil Society Studies to capture an accurate picture of the amount, character, and value of volunteer work activities that Rotary either sponsors or organizes. At the core of this

New Official Visibility for the Global Third Sector and Social Economy: A Major Statistical Breakthrough

By on October 8, 2018

Capping a three-year process, the United Nations has released a new statistical guidance document for nations to use to generate solid data on the world’s third, or social economy, sector—the TSE Sector.   Unknown by most observers, this sector—embracing nonprofit

NEWS RELEASE: Nonprofit rate of job growth outpaces for-profit rate by over 3-1 over last decade

By on August 28, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media contact: Chelsea Newhouse [download as PDF]     Data just released by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics using a technique first developed by the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies shows

NEW REPORT: Nonprofits—America’s third largest workforce

By on May 2, 2018

Employment in America’s nonprofit organizations continued to gain ground on other major industries in recent years according to a new report just issued by the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies.   Based on projections from U.S. Bureau of

Now Available From Nonprofit Works: 2015 Nonprofit Employment Data on States and Counties

By on April 25, 2018

An Important Assist to Nonprofit Advocacy Efforts Nonprofit and foundation leaders have long struggled to compete with entrenched business interests in convincing government officials of the importance of their “industry” to the states and communities in which they operate.  

In Memoriam: Dr. Helen Stone Tice

By on March 15, 2018

Dear Friends and Colleagues,   I regret to inform you that Dr. Helen Stone Tice, a long-time colleague of our Center and a former senior analyst at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), passed away this past Thursday, March

The PtP Beat Goes On: “How to Apply PtP to State-Owned Enterprises” by William L. Megginson and Lester M. Salamon

By on February 7, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse   Governments around the world have recently been involved in a significant new wave of privatizations-sales of state-owned enterprises to private companies. The 48-month period between January 2013 and December 2016 saw governments raise

Fruition and the Future: The Center in 2017

By on December 21, 2017

Dear Friends and Colleagues:   2017 may well go down as one of the most productive and significant years in the history of our Center. Indeed, as we reflect on our work over this past eventful year, two words come

The PtP Beat Goes On: “How to Apply PtP to Stolen or Stranded Assets” by Aaron Bornstein and Lester M. Salamon

By on December 4, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse     According to a recent UN report, close to US$4 trillion is stolen from governments or generated by bribes or other forms of corruption each year in countries around the world—an annual sum

Explaining Civil Society Development: What are the “Social Origins of Civil Society?”

By on September 20, 2017

As noted in a prior post, over the past 25 years, the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies, working in cooperation with a broad team of local associates through the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project, generated a powerful

NEWS RELEASE | Now available from Johns Hopkins University Press—Explaining Civil Society Development: A Social Origins Approach

By on September 6, 2017

The Johns Hopkins University Press is pleased to announce its publication of Explaining Civil Society Development: A Social Origins Approach by Lester M. Salamon, S. Wojciech Sokolowski, Megan A. Haddock, and Associates.   The civil society sector—made up of millions

The PtP Beat Goes On: A New Cache of PtP Foundations

By on July 24, 2017

The recent identification of stolen or stranded assets as another asset class to which the PtP concept can be applied has surfaced a number of new PtP foundations. Already, the PtP Project has issued a case study focusing on one

Center Director Lester Salamon Discusses the Future and Role of Foundations in China

By on June 27, 2017

In January 2017, Center Director Lester Salamon visited Beijing at the invitation of the Asia Foundation Beijing Office to speak to foundation leaders and students at the China Foundation Centre (CFC), China Donor Roundtable (CDR), and the China Global Philanthropy Institute

Now available from the PtP Project: New insights into applications of the PtP concept to different asset classes

By on April 20, 2017

The PtP Project is pleased to bring you a new report from Project Direct Dr. Lester Salamon from Project Director Dr. Lester Salamon highlighting new insights unveiled at a recent PtP Conference into how the PtP concept can be applied

Announcing Nonprofit Works: An Interactive Database on the U.S. Nonprofit Economy

By on January 25, 2017

Media contact: Chelsea Newhouse ___________________ The Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies is proud to announce the launch of Nonprofit Works, a new interactive website providing access to critical data on nonprofit employment, establishments, and wages in the United

NEW REPORT | Pennsylvania Nonprofits: A Major State Industry

By on January 24, 2017

Our newest report, Pennsylvania Nonprofits: A Major State Industry, highlights the important role the sector plays in the economic vitality of the state. The report, produced by our Nonprofit Economic Data Project, reveals that the nonprofit sector is not only

NEWS RELEASE | The BOTA Foundation: A Model for the Safe Return of Stolen Assets?

By on January 20, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse     We are pleased to announce the publication of The BOTA Foundation: A Model for the Safe Return of Stolen Assets?, the first in a series of reports from the Philanthropication thru Privatization

New Report Highlights the Economic Impact of the New York Capital Region Nonprofit Sector

By on January 10, 2017

The Center’s first report of 2017, “New York Capital Region Nonprofits: A Major Economic Engine,” produced by our Nonprofit Economic Data Project (NED) in collaboration with the New York Council of Nonprofits, Inc. (NYCON), examines the economic impact and role

Now Available: Portuguese translation of “Philanthropication thru Privatization” from IDIS

By on September 30, 2016

We are very happy to announce the publication of a Portuguese translation of Philanthropication thru Privatization: Building Permanent Endowments for the Common Good, Filantropização via Privatização: Garantindo Receitas Permanentes para o Bem Comum.   This translation was undertaken and published

Japanese edition of Leverage for Good now available

By on March 15, 2016

The Center is pleased to announce that the Japanese translation of Director Lester Salamon’s recent book, Leverage for Good: An Introduction to the New Frontiers of Philanthropy and Social Investing (Oxford University Press, 2014), is now available from Minerva Publishing!

Lester Salamon speaks to the UN Statistics Division on the revision of the UN NPI Handbook

By on March 10, 2016

Center Director Lester Salamon was invited by the United Nations Statistics Division to present the work our Center is doing to advance the international statistical revolution in the measurement and understanding of the third sector during a side event of

Meet Erik Petrovski, Fall 2015 International Philanthropy Fellow

By on February 9, 2016

The Johns Hopkins International Fellows in Philanthropy Program is a highly-selective program that welcomes one or two researchers from outside the U.S. to spend one or more semesters at our Center to conduct independent research on an aspect of the

Four Shades of Resilience: The Center for Civil Society Studies in 2015

By on December 21, 2015

Perhaps no quality captures more effectively the distinctive character of nonprofit institutions and related voluntary citizen behavior that is the focus of our Center’s attention than the quality of resilience—the ability to withstand significant shifts in fortunes and challenges and