Publications

The Center’s comprehensive database contains over 400 research products generated by our projects and staff. In order to make it easy to find what you are looking for, we have divided our publications into 4 broad categories (International, U.S.-focused, Books, and News), with increasingly specific categories (e.g. by project) as you drill down.
 
You can also search this database by country, global region, U.S. state, or keyword.
 

International Publications (338) « Downloads

Sub-Categories: Comparative Nonprofit Sector Publications (168) | Philanthropy Fellows Publications (19) | PtP Publications (14) | TSI Publications (7) | UN Handbook Publications (87) | Volunteer Measurement Publications (24)

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  • Comparative Data Tables (2004)
    Drawn from Global Civil Society: Dimensions of the Nonprofit Sector, Volume 2, these compiled tables and figures compare data from 36 countries. This packet includes tables on 1) volunteering and giving as a share of GDP by country; 2) the civil society sector workforce as a percent of the economically active population; 3) volunteering in 36 countries; 4) the civil society sector workforce by field; 5) civil society sector sources of support; and 6) volunteering and giving as a share of GDP by country. This is the most recent comparative data available from the Center; circa 1995-2002.

  • The State of Global Civil Society and Volunteering: Latest findings from the implementation of the UN Nonprofit Handbook (2013)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #49 | Lester M. Salamon, S. Wojciech Sokolowski, Megan Haddock, and Helen S. Tice. The latest findings resulting from the implementation of the UN Handbook on Nonprofit Institutions in the System of National Accounts. This report includes data on nonprofit employment, volunteering, fields of activity, contribution to GDP, expenditures, and revenues in 16 countries around the world.

  • Global Civil Society: Dimensions of the Nonprofit Sector, Volume 1 (1999)
    ISBN 1-886333-42-4 | Lester M. Salamon, Helmut K. Anheier, Regina List, Stefan Toepler, S. Wojciech Sokolowski, and Associates. Resulting from the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project, this volume presents a comprehensive country-by-country analysis of the scope, size, composition, and financing of the civil society sector in 22 countries around the world. The full text is available for download here; also available for purchase at Amazon.

  • Global Civil Society Index (2004)
    Drawn from Global Civil Society: Dimensions of the Nonprofit Sector, Volume 2, the Johns Hopkins Global Civil Society Index captures the multiple dimensions of the civil society sector in 34 countries around the world in a readily understood and compared format. Data in this Index is circa 1995-2002.

  • Global Civil Society: Dimensions of the Nonprofit Sector, Volume 2 (2004)
    ISBN 1-56549-184-X | Lester M. Salamon, S. Wojciech Sokolowski, and Associates. Resulting from the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project, this second volume of the Global Civil Society series continues our comprehensive country-by-country analysis of the scope, size, composition, and financing of the civil society sector in 22 countries around the world. This download contains the table of contents and introductory chapter; the full volume is available for purchase in paperback and Kindle editions at Amazon. See also: 36-Country Data Tables.

  • ILO Manual on the Measurement of Volunteer Work (English, 2011)
    This Manual, drafted by the Center for Civil Society Studies in cooperation with the ILO and an international Technical Experts Group, represents the first internationally sanctioned approach for gathering official data on the amount, character, and value of volunteering. This approach will generate cross-nationally comparable data, including the number of volunteers, and has the advantage of being cost-effective, efficient, reliable, and feasible in a wide variety of countries. This download contains the full Manual, including the survey module and all annexes. Also available in French, Italian, Montenegrin, and Spanish.

  • Philippines: Defining the Nonprofit Sector (2001)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #39 | Ledivina V. Cariño and PNSP Project Staff. Provides an overview of the types of organizations included in the Philippine nonprofit sector, the terms used to depict these organizations, and special features of the country’s history that have shaped the sector’s development.

  • Fellows Journal Spring 2004
    Topics include NGO partnership sustainability; human resources in Nigeria’s nonprofit sector; and civic movement and popular change in Georgia. Produced by participants in the Johns Hopkins International Fellows in Philanthropy program

  • Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project Methodology
    The Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project sought to develop a common base of data about a similar set of “nonprofit” or “voluntary” institutions in a disparate set of countries. This required that we resolve five critical methodological and conceptual challenges including selection of a set of differing countries for testing theories; clearly defining what was meant by “nonprofit” or “voluntary” organizations; development of a classification scheme; identification the most meaningful aspects of these organizations to focus on for data-gathering purposes; and devising a way to collect reliable data on these aspects in a cost-efficient fashion. This document describes how the Center went about these tasks and provides more detail on the actual sources of data used in various countries.

  • Fellows Conference Action Statement 2005: Advocating for Social Justice – A special responsibility of civil society
    Explores the social justice advocacy function of nonprofit organizations. To do so, it defines more precisely what this function entails and what forms it can usefully take; outlines some of the obstacles that impede its exercise; and suggests some steps that can be taken—by civil society organizations themselves, by foundations, by the business community, and by governments—to encourage its more effective exercise. The statement was developed by participants in the 17th annual conference of the Johns Hopkins International Fellows in Philanthropy program held in Beijing, China in July 2005.

  • Defining the Nonprofit Sector: A Cross-National Analysis (1997)
    ISBN 0-7190-4902-4 | Lester M. Salamon and Helmut K. Anheier, Eds. Establishes the building blocks for a common definition and a common classification of the nonprofit sector internationally while still recognizing the extraordinary diversity of nonprofits around the world. Covers Brazil, Egypt, France, Germany, Ghana, Hungary, India, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Thailand, the U.K., and the U.S. This download contains information from the cover of the book, as well as the table of contents. The full volume is available for purchase from Amazon.

  • Denmark: Defining the Nonprofit Sector (2005)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #44 | Bjarne Ibsen and Ulla Habermann Defines the voluntary sector in Denmark and delimits the different types of organizations included in the sector. Reviews the history and social context within which these organizations have developed. Addresses the “grey zone” of organizations that do not clearly fit under the definition of the nonprofit sector.

  • Brazil: Nonprofit Institutions Satellite Account, 2002 (2010)
    Instituto Brasilerio de Geografia e Estatistica (IBGE) produced this pilot non-profit institutions satellite account for Brazil for the year 2002 in partnership with the Center and UN Volunteers. The results of this study show that the nonprofit sector in Brazil represents a significant economic force, employing a sizable share of the workforce, and contributing to the Brazilian economy on a par with other major industries. In the process, the report demonstrates the feasibility of generating regular, detailed economic data on the nonprofit sector in Brazil at a level of detail not available through other sources. It is our hope that the report will lead to a permanent system for generating satellite accounts in the country to document the role and activity of the country’s important nonprofit institution sector. The findings show that the nonprofit sector value added in Brazil was about 34.2 billion Real (USD$26.4 billion) in 2002. Including the value of volunteers, this translates into a nonprofit sector that accounted for approximately 2.3 percent of the aggregate value of the economy in 2002.

  • UN Handbook on Nonprofit Institutions in the System of National Accounts (English)
    The full English text of the United Nations Handbook on Nonprofit Institutions in the System of National Accounts, including all Annexes.

  • Social Origins of Civil Society: An Overview (2000)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #38 | Lester M. Salamon, S. Wojciech Sokolowski, and Helmut K. Anheier. The availability of comparative cross-national data has made it possible to test the existing theories of the origins of the nonprofit sector. These theories assume a competitive relationship between the nonprofit sector and the state in the production of public goods; however, the cross-national data show no straightforward relationship between the size of the nonprofit and the government social welfare sectors. This paper provides an alternative theory that conceptualizes the nonprofit sector in the broader context of the development of social, political, and economic institutions during the period of modernization. This theory explains cross-national variations in the size of the nonprofit sector and accounts for its different roles and relationships to other social institutions such as state, class structure, and organized religion in different countries.

  • Chile: Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project National Report (2006)
    Produced by FOCUS, this report summarizes the findings of the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project work in Chile. The findings show that the Chilean nonprofit sector is the largest in Latin America, accounting for over 303 thousand full-time equivalent (FTE) paid and voluntary jobs; paid employment alone represents 2.6% of the economically active population. Data is circa 2004.

  • Companion Guide to ISIC Rev.4 and CPC Ver. 2; Draft Chapter 6.2: Non-profit Institutions (2011)
    CCSS Working Paper #24 | Lester M. Salamon. Draft of Chapter 6.2: Non-profit Institutions, submitted to the UNSD for inclusion in its forthcoming Companion Guide to ISIC and CPC.

  • ILO Manual on the Measurement of Volunteer Work (Italian, 2012)
    Questo Manuale, elaborato dal Centro Studi della Società Civile in collaborazione con l'OIL e un gruppo di tecnici esperti internazionali, rappresenta il primo approccio a livello internazionale sanzionato per la raccolta di dati ufficiali sulla quantità, il carattere e valore del volontariato . Questo approccio genera dati cross-nazionale comparabili, compreso il numero di volontari, e ha il vantaggio di essere economicamente efficace, efficiente, affidabile e realizzabile in una vasta gamma di paesi. Questo download contiene il Manuale completo, compreso il modulo per sondaggi e tutti gli allegati.

  • India: Legal Framework for Nonprofit Institutions in India (PRIA, 2001)
    PRIA Working Paper #2. One of a series of working papers produced by the Society for Participatory Research in Asia, as part of the Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project, this paper examines the contemporary legal framework in which the nonprofit sector is active in India.

  • Fellows Conference Action Statement 2003: Bridging Social Divides - The role of the third sector
    Examines the role that third sector organizations can play in overcoming social exclusion. The statement was developed by participants in the 15th annual conference of the Johns Hopkins International Fellows in Philanthropy program held in Sao Paulo, Brazil in July 2003.

  • Thailand: Nonprofit Institutions Satellite Account, 2006-2008 (2010)
    Produced by the Office of the National Social and Economic Development Board this nonprofit institutions satellite account examines data from 2006-2008. This publication finds that there were 70,792 non-profit organizations in Thailand in 2006, which contributed Baht 61,872 million to the national economy. The value of volunteer work in Thailand was valued at Baht 77,480 million in 2006, which increased to Baht 80,029 million in 2008.

  • The International Classification of Nonprofit Organizations - ICNPO. Revision 1.0 (1996)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #19 | Lester M. Salamon and Helmut K. Anheier. Presents an updated version (resulting from the Dublin Project Team Meeting in December 1995) of the Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project’s classification system (first created in 1992 through collaboration of the team of international scholars working on the Project). The classification system is increasingly used for statistical purposes in a broad cross- section of countries.

  • Kyrgyz Republic: Nonprofit Institutions Satellite Account, 2008 (Russian, 2011)
    The National Statistical Committee of the Kyrgyz Republic (NSC) produced this non-profit institutions satellite account for the year 2008 in order to allow the NSC to document and systematize the assessment, structure, financing, and role of nonprofits and volunteers in developing countries. and to enable comparisons of this contribution in Kyrgyzstan with other countries worldwide. The findings show that NPIs contributed 2.2% of total GDP; when volunteers were included, the total value added of the NPI sector was found to comprise 3.7% of GDP. Also available in English.

  • Portugal: The Portuguese Nonprofit Sector in Comparative Perspective (2006)
    Produced by Universidade Católica Portuguesa, this report by Raquel Campos Franco, S. Wojciech Sokolowski, Eileen M. H. Hairel and Lester M. Salamon, summarizes the findings of the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project work in Portugal. The findings show that the nonprofit and voluntary sector expenditures as of 2002 that represent 4.2 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP), employing 4.0 percent of the economically active population. This makes the Portuguese nonprofit sector roughly equivalent in size to that in neighboring Spain and Italy. Data is circa 2002.

  • Belgium: Nonprofit Institutions Satellite Account, 2000-2001 (French, 2005)
    Produced by the Centre for Social Economy at the University of Liege and the Hoger Instituut voor de Arbeid de la KU Leuven, this first NPI satellite account aims to capture at the voluntary sector as a whole and to address major socio-economic issues beyond the boundaries of the sector's primary areas of business. Data covers the years 2000-2001. This report is available in French.


 

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