Publications

The Center’s comprehensive database contains over 400 research products generated by our projects and staff. In order to make it easy to find what you are looking for, we have divided our publications into 4 broad categories (International, U.S.-focused, Books, and News), with increasingly specific categories (e.g. by project) as you drill down.
 
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International Publications (338) « Downloads

Sub-Categories: Comparative Nonprofit Sector Publications (168) | Philanthropy Fellows Publications (19) | PtP Publications (14) | TSI Publications (7) | UN Handbook Publications (87) | Volunteer Measurement Publications (24)

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  • Sweden: Defining the Nonprofit Sector (1995)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #16 | Tommy Lundström and Filip Wijkström. Identifies lack of knowledge about the Swedish nonprofit sector as the cause for insufficient debate about the nature and future of the sector. Existing discussions offer contradictory or overlapping terms and concepts, and some researchers question the existence of a nonprofit sector in Sweden. Although the nonprofit sector is relatively small, upon the incorporation of a broader set of organizations, primarily church and state institutions, the nonprofit sector has a more significant presence. Discusses historical, social and legal developments that lead to the creation of the Swedish nonprofit sector.

  • Sweden: Nonprofit Institutions Satellite Account, 2013 (2015)
    This is the first nonprofit institutions satellite account produced by Statistics Sweden. This publication, in Swedish with an English summary, presents estimates of the direct contribution that non-profit institutions make to the Swedish economy. Data is circa 2013.

  • Sweden: UN Handbook test report and data (2001)
    From November 2000 to July 2001, a draft version of the UN Handbook on Nonprofit Institutions in the System of National Accounts was tested in 11 countries, which varied in their level of development. This document captures the Swedish experience during this test implementation. Data used is circa 1999.

  • Sweden: Workforce, expenditures, and revenue data (1992)
    Adapted from Lester M. Salamon, S. Wojciech Sokolowski, and Associates, Global Civil Society: Dimensions of the Nonprofit Sector, Volume Two (Bloomfied, CT: Kumarian Press, 2004). Data circa 1992.

  • Switzerland: Defining the Nonprofit Sector (2009)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #46 | Bernd Helmig, Christoph Bärlocher and Georg von Schnurbein Justifies defining Switzerland’s Third Sector as an institution, despite its heterogeneous nature. Uses a conceptual and historical analysis to define the sector and place it in the context of its relationship with Swiss society and politics and their respective influences. Once defined in the Swiss context, compares and assesses the extent to which the Swiss Third Sector conforms to the internationally accepted structural-operational definition.

  • Switzerland: Government Policy and the Nonprofit Sector (2009)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #48 | Michael Nollert and Monica Budowski. Addresses the political context for nonprofit organizations in Switzerland, the Swiss political context with its particularities of a confederation and of direct democratic instruments that effect the socio-political environment, the characteristics of nonprofit organizations and their influence on politics and policies, and current issues relevant to NPOs.

  • Switzerland: Nonprofit Law (2009)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #47 | Dominique Jakob, Roman Huber and Katharina Rauber Looks into the legal requirements and forms that shape the Swiss nonprofit sector. Emphasizes specifically the legal issues surrounding foundations, religious organizations, and donations. Further addresses taxation and liability concerns, as well as accounting, auditing, and reporting requirements.

  • Switzerland: The Swiss Civil Society Sector in a Comparative Perspective (2011)
    Produced by the Institute for Research on Management of Associations, Foundations and Cooperatives (VMI), University of Fribourg, this report summarizes the findings of the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project work in Switzerland. Data is circa 2005.

  • Tanzania: Workforce, expenditures, and revenue data (2000)
    Adapted from Lester M. Salamon, S. Wojciech Sokolowski, and Associates, Global Civil Society: Dimensions of the Nonprofit Sector, Volume Two (Bloomfied, CT: Kumarian Press, 2004). Data circa 2000.

  • Thailand: Defining the Nonprofit Sector (1993)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #11 | Amara Pongsapich. Explains that the nonprofit sector in Thailand is viewed as a competitor to the country’s military governments, but is being recognized as essential to the economic and social development of the country. Traces the origins of the Thai nonprofit sector to religion and describes the emergence of non-religious organizations following World War II. Explains that the sector has grown despite periods of suppression and has also been influenced by the presence of Catholic missionaries in Thailand. Describes the major types of nonprofit organizations in contemporary Thailand and their legal statuses in the eyes of the government.

  • Thailand: Nonprofit Institutions Satellite Account, 2006-2008 (2010)
    Produced by the Office of the National Social and Economic Development Board this nonprofit institutions satellite account examines data from 2006-2008. This publication finds that there were 70,792 non-profit organizations in Thailand in 2006, which contributed Baht 61,872 million to the national economy. The value of volunteer work in Thailand was valued at Baht 77,480 million in 2006, which increased to Baht 80,029 million in 2008.

  • Thailand: Nonprofit Institutions Satellite Account, 2006-2012 (2016)
    Produced by the Office of the National Social and Economic Development Board this publications includes an English translation of Chapter 3 in the “Non-Profit Institutions Satellite Account of Thailand, 2012” and updates the data provided in the 2010 Satellite Account. This publication finds that there were 76,685 non-profit organizations in Thailand in 2012—an increase of 5,893 between 2006 and 2012—which contributed Baht 75,633 million to the national economy and employed a total of 182,163 paid workers and 803,621 volunteers. For the full report in Thai, and for previous Satellite Accounts, please visit nesdb.go.th.

  • Thailand: UN Handbook test report (2001)
    Belgium: UN Handbook test report (2001) From November 2000 to July 2001, a draft version of the UN Handbook on Nonprofit Institutions in the System of National Accounts was tested in 11 countries, which varied in their level of development. This document captures the Thai experience during this test implementation.

  • The BOTA Foundation: A Model for the Safe Return of Stolen Assets? (2016)
    Aaron Bornstein. This report represents the first in a series of case studies undertaken by the Philanthropication thru Privatization (PtP) Project and reports on perhaps the major example to date of the application of the PtP concept to stolen or stranded assets: the case of the BOTA Foundation in Kazakhstan, which arose from the seizure of the assets that an American citizen secured from a number of U.S. oil companies in the 1990’s and delivered to officials in the Government of Kazakhstan in order to secure prospecting and oil drilling rights for the companies in the Caspian Sea. To prepare this case study, the PtP Project enlisted Mr. Aaron Bornstein, who served as a program director, and later as the executive director, of the BOTA Foundation on behalf of IREX, a U.S.-based nonprofit organization selected by the World Bank in response to a competitive tender to operate this foundation. To ensure the objectivity of this account, the draft was been submitted for review by personnel from the World Bank and IREX that were involved in the BOTA case. Edited and with a foreword by PtP Project Director Lester M. Salamon.

  • The Civil Society Sector: A New Global Force (1996)
    CCSS Working Paper #11 | Lester M. Salamon and Helmut K. Anheier. The civil society sector, which encompasses private, nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations, is one of the most significant social innovations in the twentieth century. Research findings from a major undertaking to chart the international nonprofit sector are used to sketch a picture of the civil society sector. Observations include a discussion of the sector’s expenditures, contribution to employment growth, and scope of activities.

  • The Emerging Sector Revisited: A Summary with Revised Estimates (1999)
    ISBN 1-886333-40-8 | Lester M. Salamon, Helmut K. Anheier, and Associates. Reports results from the second phase of the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project (1995-1999), Offers an international overview of the scope, structure, financing and role of the nonprofit sector in 22 countries throughout the world. Targeting the nonprofit sector in countries within Western Europe, Central and Eastern Europe, Latin America, and other developed countries (including the U.S., Japan, Israel, and Australia). Captures both local and regional circumstances and peculiarities, and provides a comprehensive empirical overview of the nonprofit sector at the local, regional, and global level. Also available in Spanish.

  • The Emerging Sector Revisited: A Summary with Revised Estimates (Español, 1999)
    ISBN 1-886333-40-8 | Lester M. Salamon, Helmut K. Anheier, y Asociados. Informes de resultados de la segunda fase del proyecto Johns Hopkins Comparativo del Sector Sin Fines de Lucro (1995-1999), ofrece un panorama internacional del ámbito de aplicación, estructura, financiamiento y el papel del sector sin fines de lucro en 22 países de todo el mundo. Dirigidas al sector sin fines de lucro en los países de Europa Occidental, Europa Central y Oriental, América Latina y otros países desarrollados (incluidos los EE.UU., Japón, Israel y Australia). Captura tanto las circunstancias locales y regionales y las peculiaridades, y ofrece un panorama general empírico del sector sin fines de lucro a nivel local, regional y global.

  • The Emerging Sector: An Overview (1994)
    ISBN 1-8863-3300-9 | Lester M. Salamon and Helmut K. Anheier. The first publication to emerge from the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project, this volume presents the project's initial findings, bringing the world's nonprofit sector into empirical focus for the first time. This download contains information from the cover of the book, as well as the table of contents. The full volume is available for purchase from Amazon.

  • The Emerging Sector: An Overview (1996)
    ISBN 0-7190-4871-0 | Lester M. Salamon and Helmut K. Anheier. Features an expanded discussion of the initial implementation of the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project. Discusses the increasingly influential role played by nonprofit organizations in the economies and societies of countries throughout the world. Offers an international overview of the scope, structure, financing and role of the nonprofit sector and features a comparative summary of the findings of individual empirical analyses into the nonprofit sectors in 12 countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Hungary, Japan, Brazil, Ghana, Egypt, Thailand and India. Explores the global scale of the sector, its sources of revenue, and differences between the countries analyzed and assesses how well-equipped nonprofit organizations are to respond to the shift towards voluntarism and away from government in many societies, and they identifies the key issues such organizations need to address in the future, such as coming to terms with globalization. This download contains information from the cover of the book, as well as the table of contents. The full volume is available for purchase from Amazon.

  • The Global Associational Revolution: The Rise of the Third Sector on the World Scene (2001)
    CCSS Working Paper #4 | Lester M. Salamon. This article examines the striking growth of a global nonprofit sector in the past two decades. It details the pressures stimulating the growth of the nonprofit sector in disparate settings worldwide, tracing these developments to four “crises” and two revolutions. These have combined to weaken the role of the state and increase both the need and opportunity for organized private charity.

  • The Influence of the Legal Environment on the Development of the Nonprofit Sector (2000)
    CCSS Working Paper #17 | Lester M. Salamon and Stefan Toepler. This paper discusses a transaction cost-based theoretical framework for understanding possible impacts of law on nonprofit development; develops a nonprofit law index on the basis of this framework; and tests empirically whether there is a relationship between the size of the nonprofit sector and the degree of legal enablement in a cross-section of countries.

  • The International Classification of Nonprofit Organizations - ICNPO. Revision 1.0 (1996)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #19 | Lester M. Salamon and Helmut K. Anheier. Presents an updated version (resulting from the Dublin Project Team Meeting in December 1995) of the Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project’s classification system (first created in 1992 through collaboration of the team of international scholars working on the Project). The classification system is increasingly used for statistical purposes in a broad cross- section of countries.

  • The International Guide to Nonprofit Law (1997)
    ISBN 0-4710-5518-2 | Lester M. Salamon and Stefan Toepler. A comprehensive reference to nonprofit laws and regulations in 22 countries including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Egypt, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, Poland, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, United Kingdom, and United States. Issues covered for each country include basic nonprofit law, types of organizations, internal management controls, taxation, business income, lobbying, reporting requirements, employee/board compensation and benefits, international activity and general trends. This download contains information from the cover of the book. The full volume is available for purchase from Amazon.

  • The Nonprofit Sector in the Developing World (1998)
    ISBN 0-7190-5386-2 | Lester M. Salamon and Helmut K. Anheier, Eds. Examines the upsurge of organized private, nonprofit activity in the countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America and the important role these organizations can play in the processes of economic and political change. Presents research on the nonprofit sector in Brazil, Ghana, Egypt, India, and Thailand. This download contains information from the cover of the book, as well as the table of contents. The full volume is available for purchase from Amazon.

  • The Nonprofit Sector in the United Nations System of National Accounts: Definition, Treatment, and Practice (1992)
    Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #4 | Helmut K. Anheier, Gabriel Rudney, and Lester M. Salamon. Describes the conceptualization of the nonprofit sector in the United Nations System of National Accounts (SNA) and the development of its sector-based typology. Compares the real-world application of SNA guidelines in various countries and produces an overall assessment in terms of scope of coverage and data quality. Finally, in light of this assessment and of revisions made in the guidelines, recommends a reconceptualization of the nonprofit sector, using a structural/operational definition, rather than a client/revenue criterion.


 

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