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Measuring Social Consequences of Non-Profit Institution Activities: A Research Note (2014) « International Publications « Downloads
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Date postedFebruary 24, 2014
Downloaded1765 times
CategoriesInternational Publications, Comparative Nonprofit Sector Publications, CNP Working Papers
Tagsimpact, measurement, sna, outcome
Description

Comparative Nonprofit Sector Working Paper #50 | S. Wojciech Sokolowski.
This paper proposes a model of a standardized measurement of social benefits created by NPI activities for the purpose of macro-economic analysis. The proposed model draws from the well-established in measurement methodology concepts: the program logic model and the supply and use and input/output tables used in the System of National Accounts. The model is based on standard definitions of NPI central products (material output) and social beneficiaries of those products (outcomes), and allocates quantitative shares of those products to different types of beneficiaries. Seven material output/outcome matrices for the industries in which NPIs tend to concentrate are proposed: education, health care, social assistance, housing construction and services, community development, culture, arts and recreation and membership organizations. Each matrix allocates material output to different outcomes for the entire industry, and separately for NPIs in that industry, which allows comparing NPIs against industry wide benchmarks. The paper also proposes a model for measuring broader social impacts that includes direct and consequential benefits as well as savings in social spending.


 

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