The PtP Beat Goes On: “How to Apply PtP to Stolen or Stranded Assets” by Aaron Bornstein and Lester M. Salamon

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse     According to a recent UN report, close to US$4 trillion is stolen from governments or generated by bribes or other forms of corruption each year in countries around the world—an annual sum well above the total budgets of numerous developing and transition country governments. Despite often heroic efforts, however, the record of successful discovery, confiscation, and effective return for social re-use of these vast assets has been frustratingly meager.   This limited success in returning such assets for effective social re-use is largely due to the complexity of the process. Also at work, however, is that so much of the attention has had to focus on the challenges of locating, documenting, freezing, and confiscating stolen assets that too little attention has been available to focus on the all-important question of what to do with these assets if and when they become available for potential return.   The document being released today by the PtP Project seeks to remedy this shortcoming by focusing on one of the most promising of the social re-use and return options available. This is the option exemplified by the case of the BOTA Foundation in Kazakhstan, and...

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NEWS RELEASE | Now available from Johns Hopkins University Press—Explaining Civil Society Development: A Social Origins Approach

The Johns Hopkins University Press is pleased to announce its publication of Explaining Civil Society Development: A Social Origins Approach by Lester M. Salamon, S. Wojciech Sokolowski, Megan A. Haddock, and Associates.   The civil society sector—made up of millions of nonprofit organizations, associations, charitable institutions, and the volunteers and resources they mobilize—has long been the invisible subcontinent on the landscape of contemporary society. For the past twenty-five years, however, scholars under the umbrella of the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project have worked with statisticians in countries around the world to assemble the first comprehensive, empirical picture of the size, structure, financing, and role of this increasingly important component of society.   This new book is the capstone of this 25-year undertaking and a crucial successor to the previous books to emerge from this work. Not only does Explaining Civil Society Development draw together all of the systematic comparative data on the nonprofit sector, volunteering, and philanthropy assembled by this Project on over 42 countries around the world, but also takes the next step by going beyond description to address the important analytical question of what accounts for the enormous and puzzling cross-national variations that these data reveal...

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Announcing Nonprofit Works: An Interactive Database on the U.S. Nonprofit Economy

Media contact: Chelsea Newhouse ___________________ The Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies is proud to announce the launch of Nonprofit Works, a new interactive website providing access to critical data on nonprofit employment, establishments, and wages in the United States from 1990-2011. With this new resource, you will be able to answer crucial questions like: How many people work for nonprofits in your state or county? In what fields are those jobs concentrated? How do nonprofit jobs compare to those in other sectors working in the same fields? How much have nonprofits contributed to job growth? How much do nonprofit wages contribute to the local economy? Are nonprofits present where they are most needed in your community?   Background America’s nonprofit sector employs the third largest workforce of any of the 18 industries into which statistical authorities divide the American economy, behind only retail trade and manufacturing, but ahead of construction, transportation, and finance and insurance. What is more, it is adding employment at a rate that exceeds that of the country’s for-profit business sector.   Surprised? You shouldn’t be. But, due to the way economic data are collected and reported in our country, these striking facts about...

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NEWS RELEASE | The BOTA Foundation: A Model for the Safe Return of Stolen Assets?

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse     We are pleased to announce the publication of The BOTA Foundation: A Model for the Safe Return of Stolen Assets?, the first in a series of reports from the Philanthropication thru Privatization Project (PtP) examining important examples of significant charitable endowments that have resulted from the sale or other transformation of government-owned or -controlled assets.   Prepared by international development specialist Aaron Bornstein and edited with an Introduction by PtP Project Director and Johns Hopkins University Professor Dr. Lester M. Salamon, this report analyzes the major example to date of the application of the PtP concept to stolen or disputed assets: the case of the BOTA Foundation in Kazakhstan, which arose from the seizure of assets totaling US$84 million that an American citizen secured from U.S. oil companies in the 1990s and channeled to high level officials in the Government of Kazakhstan in order to secure oil drilling rights in the Caspian Sea.   As such, it profiles one of over 550 charitable foundations that have emerged from some type of transaction transforming a government-owned or government-controlled asset into a charitable foundation. In the process, it helps point the way to...

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Now Available: Portuguese translation of “Philanthropication thru Privatization” from IDIS

We are very happy to announce the publication of a Portuguese translation of Philanthropication thru Privatization: Building Permanent Endowments for the Common Good, Filantropização via Privatização: Garantindo Receitas Permanentes para o Bem Comum.   This translation was undertaken and published by Brazil’s IDIS–Instituto para o Desenvolvimento do Investimento Social with the guidance of Marcos Kisil, IDIS founder and a consultant for the PtP Project. In addition to the full text of the English version of the report, this new translation includes a forward by Mr. Kisil that sheds light on the history of privatization transactions in Brazil and the relevance of the PtP model for in that country going forward. Below, is an English translation of Mr. Kisil’s insightful forward.     ______________________________ Foreword to Filantropização via Privatização: Garantindo Receitas Permanentes para o Bem Comum:   The publication of the book Filantropização via Privatização, an IDIS initiative, is the result of the project directed by Professor Lester Salamon who explored the potential to create or strengthen the endowments of civil society organizations through the processes of privatization.   Endowments resulting from privatizations conducted by governments demonstrate that the assets do not belong only to the State, but also to...

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Japanese edition of Leverage for Good now available

The Center is pleased to announce that the Japanese translation of Director Lester Salamon’s recent book, Leverage for Good: An Introduction to the New Frontiers of Philanthropy and Social Investing (Oxford University Press, 2014), is now available from Minerva Publishing!   The Center is grateful to 2012-2013 International Fellow in Philanthropy Tatsusaki Kobayashi for his assistance and persistence in facilitating this translation and for his key recognition of the importance that the developments outlined in this book hold for the future of the philanthropic sector in Japan.   You can learn more about Leverage for Good and its companion volume, The New Frontiers of Philanthropy: A Guide to the New Tools and New Actors Reshaping Global Philanthropy and Social Investing (Oxford University Press, 2014), here.   Both volumes are also available for purchase in English in hard copy and e-book editions at Amazon and directly from Oxford University Press.     TABLE OF CONTENTS Leverage for Good: An Introduction to the New Frontiers of Philanthropy and Social Investing Introduction: The Revolution on the Frontiers of Philanthropy Scouting Philanthropy’s New Frontier I: The New Actors Scouting Philanthropy’s New Frontier II: The New Tools Why Now? Remaining Obstacles Prescription: The Way...

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Announcing The Resilient Sector Revisited: The New Challenge to Nonprofit America

We are happy to announce the release by Brookings Institution Press of Center Director Lester Salamon’s latest book, The Resilient Sector Revisited: The New Challenge to Nonprofit America!   Published in August, this second edition of The Resilient Sector provides a wealth of new data to paint a compelling picture of an important set of American institutions buffeted by a withering set of challenges, yet still finding ways to survive and prosper.   Operating in an increasingly competitive environment in which traditional sources of government and philanthropic support have proved difficult to expand, U.S. nonprofits have turned decisively, and successfully, to the market. But this survival strategy has put at risk many of the very features that make nonprofits so valuable.   To reduce these risks, Dr. Salamon recommends a “renewal strategy” for the nation’s nonprofit sector that begins with a clearer articulation and application of the sector’s “value proposition.”   Click on the image below to download the flyer and table of contents. The full volume is available for order from Amazon and Brookings in hard copy and e-reader editions.      ...

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Revision of the UN Nonprofit Handbook underway

  In 2002, the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies partnered with the United Nations Statistics Division and an international team of statistical experts to develop the first UN Handbook on Nonprofit Institutions in the System of National Accounts. This NPI Handbook offers a way for national statistical agencies to identify and measure nonprofit, or civil society, organizations in their countries in a comparable manner.   To date, nearly 20 countries have produced official data on the nonprofit sectors in their countries shedding far more clarity on the size, scope, revenue, and contributions of this important sector around the world. The latest comparative results of these efforts are reported in The State of Global Civil Society and Volunteering: Latest findings from the implementation of the UN Nonprofit Handbook (2013).   Over a decade after its publication, we are excited to report that a revision of the UN NPI Handbook is now underway. The revision will draw on the experiences and lessons-learned from the countries that have implemented the Handbook, and will provide additional practical tools and guidance materials to make it more straightforward to implement and produce comparative data.   The revised UN NPI Handbook will not change...

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NEWS RELEASE | A “win-win” solution for transforming the philanthropic landscape of the world

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   With the resources and capabilities of governments and private charity barely growing or in decline around the world, yet the problems of poverty, ill-health, and environmental degradation ballooning daily, it is increasingly clear that new energies, and new resources, are urgently needed to address the world’s pressing social and environmental challenges.   Now a new book, Philanthropication thru Privatization: Building Permanent Endowments for the Common Good by Dr. Lester Salamon of the Johns Hopkins University and the East-West Management Institute, offers a novel solution to this increasingly urgent problem: capture all or a portion of the enormous privatization transactions under way around the world for autonomous charitable endowments serving the social and economic needs of citizens.   Far from an abstract idea, philanthropication thru privatization, or PtP, turns out to be a proven and effective approach for creating or enlarging charitable assets. But it has yet to be recognized as such: until now.   About Philanthropication thru Privatization In this book, Salamon provides a first conceptualization of the PtP concept and then, working with an international team, documents over 500 foundations around the world that already embody it, including some of the largest and most...

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NEWS RELEASE | Two new books from Lester Salamon explore the revolution under way on the frontiers of philanthropy and social investment

Oxford University Press and Lester Salamon Announce Two New Books: NEW FRONTIERS OF PHILANTHROPY and LEVERAGE FOR GOOD  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse   With the resources of both governments and traditional philanthropy barely growing or in decline while the problems of poverty, ill-health and environmental degradation continue to balloon, it has become increasingly clear that new models for financing and promoting social and environmental objectives are urgently needed. Fortunately, according to Johns Hopkins University Professor Dr. Lester Salamon, a significant revolution appears to be underway on the frontiers of philanthropy and social investing that is providing a potentially crucial part of the response to this predicament.     Mapping a significant revolution in social-purpose finance In New Frontiers of Philanthropy: A Guide to the New Tools and New Actors that Are Reshaping Global Philanthropy and Social Investing, published by Oxford University Press, and Leverage for Good: An Introduction to the New Frontiers of Philanthropy, a companion volume that carries just the Introduction to this larger volume, Salamon, a well-known pioneer in the study of the global nonprofit sector and philanthropy, has mobilized an extraordinary team of experts to produce the most comprehensive and authoritative guide available to...

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The Center’s 12 gifts of 2012

It has been another busy and productive year for the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies. We have expanded the base of knowledge about nonprofit organizations in the U.S. and around the world; gathered our Philanthropy Fellows family for our 21st Conference, this time in lovely Portugal; ventured farther than we have ever done into the world of philanthropy, but philanthropy quite broadly conceived; and, uncharacteristically for us given our reputation for charting the economic scale of the civil society sector, launched a major effort to identify, and renew the sector’s commitment to, its distinctive values. In truth, of course, value concerns have never been far from the work that we do, or from the connections we have forged with the numerous colleagues and partners we rely on. This is an opportunity, therefore, to let our colleagues, our support system at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies, the many funders of our work, and our wide-ranging collaborators on book projects and studies know how much we value their contributions to what we do. Listed below is a description of some of the twelve major gifts that they have helped us to deliver in 2012.     A...

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NEWS RELEASE | Counting the Volunteers the World Counts On

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   The International Labour Organization (ILO) and the Johns Hopkins University Center for Civil Society Studies announced today the release of a new manual to help statistical agencies around the world track the amount, type and value of volunteer work in their countries.   The Manual, drafted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies in cooperation with the ILO and an International Technical Experts Group, and with the support of the United Nations Volunteers, represents the first-ever internationally sanctioned guidance to statistical agencies for generating reliable, official data on volunteer work using a common definition and approach.   “Volunteer work is an enormous renewable resource for social, economic, and environmental problem-solving throughout the world, as we are sure to discover again in the wake of the Japanese earthquake and tsunami. But the lack of solid data on volunteering has left it under-valued and its full potentials unrealized,” noted Lester M. Salamon, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies. “This Manual promises to change this fundamentally. The challenge now is to secure government commitments to implement it.”   Previous work by the Center has shown that, even conservatively estimated, the value of...

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We’re listening — give us your thoughts on future Listening Post Soundings!

The Listening Post Project seeks to “take the pulse” of the nonprofit sector by fielding surveys on timely issues for nonprofits and making sure the findings are broadly disseminated to the sector and beyond. In the past year, we have covered cutting-edge topics such as what nonprofits want from the new presidential administration and how they are faring in the economic downturn.   Most recently we have gathered extremely valuable data on the state of nonprofit healthcare benefits and pensions,which have been instrumental in helping to get nonprofits on the national policy agenda.   As 2010 approaches, we want to ensure that the Listening Post Project remains at the forefront of knowledge-gathering for the nonprofit sector. We will be fielding a survey on nonprofit innovations and performance measurement in early January.   What are some other topics you would like to see in following Soundings? Please let us know!  ...

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