NOW AVAILABLE: Maryland Nonprofit Economic Impact Report & Data Dashboard

Nonprofit sector drives economic and community development in Maryland The Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Economic Data Project and Maryland Nonprofits are pleased to release Maryland Nonprofits by the Numbers. This report is the first comprehensive study of the nonprofit sector in Maryland in five years and is available for free download here.   “This report demonstrates what we have always known,” said Maryland Nonprofits President & CEO Heather Iliff, “that nonprofit organizations are essential drivers of economic and community development in Maryland.”   Maryland Nonprofits by the Numbers tapped the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Business Master File and Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) to offer insight into Maryland’s nonprofit sector’s size, scope, and growth.   Highlighting the economic impact of Maryland’s nonprofit sector, the report finds that nonprofits employ 280,000 workers—nearly 13% of all non-governmental workers in Maryland—and more than every other major private industry in the state, with the single exception of retail trade. These nonprofit workers earned nearly $16 billion in total wages in 2017, with the average weekly nonprofit wage nearly equal to wages in the for-profit sector as a whole.   Other key findings include: Maryland’s nonprofits are a...

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The Nonprofit Sector in Maryland: An update

Today, the Center is pleased to release an update on nonprofit employment in our home state of Maryland. The report, produced by our Nonprofit Economic Data Project in cooperation with Maryland Nonprofits, finds that the nonprofit sector in the state continues to play a vital – even dominant – role in Maryland’s economic life and recovery from the recent recession.   OVERALL EMPLOYMENT Maryland boasts one of the most robust nonprofit sectors in the country in terms of employment. Nationally, the nonprofit sector employs 8.4 percent of the total workforce. In Maryland, that number is 11% — that means that nonprofits in Maryland employ 1 IN EVERY 9 WORKERS in the state. Indeed, the nonprofit sector in Maryland is the SECOND LARGEST EMPLOYER among state industries, trailing retail trade by only about 12,000 paid workers. Significantly, nonprofit organizations actually employ more than 2 ½ times the number of workers employed in the manufacturing industry, and almost twice the number of workers in the construction industry – two industries that are often considered absolutely vital to the fiscal health of the state.   The importance of the nonprofit sector to overall fiscal health of the state becomes even clearer when...

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Nonprofits Add Jobs in Maryland Despite Economic Downturn

Today, the Center’s Nonprofit Economic Data Project (NED) released the latest Maryland Nonprofit Employment Update, which examines nonprofit employment in Maryland during the current economic downturn. The report was produced as a joint product of the Center and Maryland Nonprofits.   The data examined for this report show that employment in Maryland’s nonprofit sector grew 1.6 percent between 2009 and 2010, while the state’s for-profit businesses experienced a 1.1 percent job loss during the same period. This pattern of nonprofit job growth held true for all regions of the state, although recent growth was slightly lower than the 2.0 percent growth recorded from 2008 to 2009.   Between 2008 and 2010, the strongest growth, 5.5 percent, was found in the health field, but membership and social assistance organizations also added workers. In sharp contrast, employment at the state’s arts and culture organizations declined by 4.3 percent.   “For more than a decade, Maryland’s nonprofit organizations have demonstrated resilience through good and bad economic times,” said Center Director Lester M. Salamon. “But it is clear that the current economic climate is taking a toll on many organizations.”   “This report demonstrates what a critical role nonprofits play in our economy,”...

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