Now Available From Nonprofit Works: 2015 Nonprofit Employment Data on States and Counties

An Important Assist to Nonprofit Advocacy Efforts Nonprofit and foundation leaders have long struggled to compete with entrenched business interests in convincing government officials of the importance of their “industry” to the states and communities in which they operate.   Thanks to research carried out by the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies drawing on data long buried in the computers of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, however, nonprofits and those that support them now have an easy message with which to attract policy-maker attention: Nonprofits now provide more jobs than almost all other industries in states and communities across the nation, outdistancing firms in construction, banking and insurance, transportation, real estate, and, in many states, all branches of manufacturing combined. And this is beyond all the social benefits nonprofits contribute. Now, updated data on nonprofit employment by state and county is only a click away thanks to the launch of Nonprofit Works, the interactive website that Johns Hopkins researchers have created to bring powerful data on nonprofit employment, establishments, and wages to the fingertips of nonprofit organizations, researchers, and those supporting them in states and counties throughout the country.   Initially launched in 2017 with data...

Continue reading

The PtP Beat Goes On: “How to Apply PtP to State-Owned Enterprises” by William L. Megginson and Lester M. Salamon

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse   Governments around the world have recently been involved in a significant new wave of privatizations-sales of state-owned enterprises to private companies. The 48-month period between January 2013 and December 2016 saw governments raise more money through privatization sales than during any comparable previous period. Yet three times worth of government enterprises than the $3.5 trillion sold since 1977 still remain in government hands, many of them awaiting sale.   What happens to the vast resources secured through such sales? Too often, it is difficult to determine. Stories of widespread corruption are rampant. Even when the proceeds are appropriately channeled into government budgets, however, their uses are hard to track. But these are the people’s assets, often the only real assets a population has. Surely a case can be made for handling them more responsibly and ensuring that citizens get a clearer benefit from their use. This is especially so given what is often the “upside-down” effects such asset sales can produce-yielding positive economic benefits for companies and citizens that are often long in coming and too dispersed to be clearly felt; while producing immediate harms in the form of lost jobs and...

Continue reading

The PtP Beat Goes On: “How to Apply PtP to Stolen or Stranded Assets” by Aaron Bornstein and Lester M. Salamon

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse     According to a recent UN report, close to US$4 trillion is stolen from governments or generated by bribes or other forms of corruption each year in countries around the world—an annual sum well above the total budgets of numerous developing and transition country governments. Despite often heroic efforts, however, the record of successful discovery, confiscation, and effective return for social re-use of these vast assets has been frustratingly meager.   This limited success in returning such assets for effective social re-use is largely due to the complexity of the process. Also at work, however, is that so much of the attention has had to focus on the challenges of locating, documenting, freezing, and confiscating stolen assets that too little attention has been available to focus on the all-important question of what to do with these assets if and when they become available for potential return.   The document being released today by the PtP Project seeks to remedy this shortcoming by focusing on one of the most promising of the social re-use and return options available. This is the option exemplified by the case of the BOTA Foundation in Kazakhstan, and...

Continue reading

NEWS RELEASE | Now available from Johns Hopkins University Press—Explaining Civil Society Development: A Social Origins Approach

The Johns Hopkins University Press is pleased to announce its publication of Explaining Civil Society Development: A Social Origins Approach by Lester M. Salamon, S. Wojciech Sokolowski, Megan A. Haddock, and Associates.   The civil society sector—made up of millions of nonprofit organizations, associations, charitable institutions, and the volunteers and resources they mobilize—has long been the invisible subcontinent on the landscape of contemporary society. For the past twenty-five years, however, scholars under the umbrella of the Johns Hopkins Comparative Nonprofit Sector Project have worked with statisticians in countries around the world to assemble the first comprehensive, empirical picture of the size, structure, financing, and role of this increasingly important component of society.   This new book is the capstone of this 25-year undertaking and a crucial successor to the previous books to emerge from this work. Not only does Explaining Civil Society Development draw together all of the systematic comparative data on the nonprofit sector, volunteering, and philanthropy assembled by this Project on over 42 countries around the world, but also takes the next step by going beyond description to address the important analytical question of what accounts for the enormous and puzzling cross-national variations that these data reveal...

Continue reading

Announcing Nonprofit Works: An Interactive Database on the U.S. Nonprofit Economy

Media contact: Chelsea Newhouse ___________________ The Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies is proud to announce the launch of Nonprofit Works, a new interactive website providing access to critical data on nonprofit employment, establishments, and wages in the United States from 1990-2011. With this new resource, you will be able to answer crucial questions like: How many people work for nonprofits in your state or county? In what fields are those jobs concentrated? How do nonprofit jobs compare to those in other sectors working in the same fields? How much have nonprofits contributed to job growth? How much do nonprofit wages contribute to the local economy? Are nonprofits present where they are most needed in your community?   Background America’s nonprofit sector employs the third largest workforce of any of the 18 industries into which statistical authorities divide the American economy, behind only retail trade and manufacturing, but ahead of construction, transportation, and finance and insurance. What is more, it is adding employment at a rate that exceeds that of the country’s for-profit business sector.   Surprised? You shouldn’t be. But, due to the way economic data are collected and reported in our country, these striking facts about...

Continue reading

NEWS RELEASE | The BOTA Foundation: A Model for the Safe Return of Stolen Assets?

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse     We are pleased to announce the publication of The BOTA Foundation: A Model for the Safe Return of Stolen Assets?, the first in a series of reports from the Philanthropication thru Privatization Project (PtP) examining important examples of significant charitable endowments that have resulted from the sale or other transformation of government-owned or -controlled assets.   Prepared by international development specialist Aaron Bornstein and edited with an Introduction by PtP Project Director and Johns Hopkins University Professor Dr. Lester M. Salamon, this report analyzes the major example to date of the application of the PtP concept to stolen or disputed assets: the case of the BOTA Foundation in Kazakhstan, which arose from the seizure of assets totaling US$84 million that an American citizen secured from U.S. oil companies in the 1990s and channeled to high level officials in the Government of Kazakhstan in order to secure oil drilling rights in the Caspian Sea.   As such, it profiles one of over 550 charitable foundations that have emerged from some type of transaction transforming a government-owned or government-controlled asset into a charitable foundation. In the process, it helps point the way to...

Continue reading

Japanese edition of Leverage for Good now available

The Center is pleased to announce that the Japanese translation of Director Lester Salamon’s recent book, Leverage for Good: An Introduction to the New Frontiers of Philanthropy and Social Investing (Oxford University Press, 2014), is now available from Minerva Publishing!   The Center is grateful to 2012-2013 International Fellow in Philanthropy Tatsusaki Kobayashi for his assistance and persistence in facilitating this translation and for his key recognition of the importance that the developments outlined in this book hold for the future of the philanthropic sector in Japan.   You can learn more about Leverage for Good and its companion volume, The New Frontiers of Philanthropy: A Guide to the New Tools and New Actors Reshaping Global Philanthropy and Social Investing (Oxford University Press, 2014), here.   Both volumes are also available for purchase in English in hard copy and e-book editions at Amazon and directly from Oxford University Press.     TABLE OF CONTENTS Leverage for Good: An Introduction to the New Frontiers of Philanthropy and Social Investing Introduction: The Revolution on the Frontiers of Philanthropy Scouting Philanthropy’s New Frontier I: The New Actors Scouting Philanthropy’s New Frontier II: The New Tools Why Now? Remaining Obstacles Prescription: The Way...

Continue reading

NEWS RELEASE | Two new books from Lester Salamon explore the revolution under way on the frontiers of philanthropy and social investment

Oxford University Press and Lester Salamon Announce Two New Books: NEW FRONTIERS OF PHILANTHROPY and LEVERAGE FOR GOOD  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse   With the resources of both governments and traditional philanthropy barely growing or in decline while the problems of poverty, ill-health and environmental degradation continue to balloon, it has become increasingly clear that new models for financing and promoting social and environmental objectives are urgently needed. Fortunately, according to Johns Hopkins University Professor Dr. Lester Salamon, a significant revolution appears to be underway on the frontiers of philanthropy and social investing that is providing a potentially crucial part of the response to this predicament.     Mapping a significant revolution in social-purpose finance In New Frontiers of Philanthropy: A Guide to the New Tools and New Actors that Are Reshaping Global Philanthropy and Social Investing, published by Oxford University Press, and Leverage for Good: An Introduction to the New Frontiers of Philanthropy, a companion volume that carries just the Introduction to this larger volume, Salamon, a well-known pioneer in the study of the global nonprofit sector and philanthropy, has mobilized an extraordinary team of experts to produce the most comprehensive and authoritative guide available to...

Continue reading